An Introspection into One’s Self (Continued...)
Joseph B. Clifford, D.C.
Say "NO!" to the development and  production genetically modified foods! Help support the growth of healthy, organic food production.
Protect our Constitution!

Side notes:

The sensory processes may be something like this: 1.Things make sense, at conscious and/or subconscious levels 2..As more chaos is internalized, less and less sense is made from outside or inside processes 3.After reorganization, greater  clarity is perceived in a brand new way, as never before imagined, and  more efficient responsiveness is available.      As a BioGeometric Integration  chiropractor, I speak in terms of our adjustments or entrainments helping each nervous system to resolve 'tensions' of the spine and its cord, which may have been associated with neural engrams (Ie. nervous system memories or “snapshots”).    BioGeometric Integration  care provides a means by which the tissues of our  nervous system and body can release pent up energy, mental resistance, and physical tensions, created by old physical, emotional, and chemical overloads.     Note: In moving through a personal growth process, including our   BioGeometric Integration   chiropractic care, it is crucial that one begin to notice which  behaviors, in moments of temporary overwhelm, are attempts to block or deaden the incoming energy and which are attempts to frantically dissipate entropy back into the environment.   A challenge presents itself when a large segment of the society requires some form of 're- educational' process prior to initiating care.  Comfort zones are  "stretched", as new seekers of care are exposed to such concepts as Innate Intelligence, healing, and Life force. I do find, however, a thrill and honor in presenting a set of different values and prospective  goals to new entries and to those of the practice who have been with us as part of our BioGeometric Integration family.

Our Brain:

 Our brain is the ultimate dissipative structure. It constantly takes in energy, in the

forms of different stimuli (from our senses that detect light, sound, vibration, heat,

pressure, touch, etc.) and matter from the environment. It must also dissipate the

entropy that is created back into its surroundings. In a healthy state, we can

handle amazing amounts of flux, while encountering all kinds of new ideas,

stimuli, and internal and external environmental events. It can handle these

changes without threat to the system. 

 If inputs of  stimuli (be they mental/emotional/ physical, or chemical) reach a

certain critical point (each of us has individual differences), we begin to feel

overwhelmed, and we become less and less capable of dealing with continued

environmental stimulating inputs. Without some relief, the  system (our mental

constructs of “What is”, is forced either to break down or to reorganize into a

higher and more organized level.

 This "moment of truth" will in all likelihood be  experienced (escaping into a

higher order) by people at individual rates, while other individuals may very slowly

or never grow into a higher order.  Abraham Maslow called this event a "peak

experience". Those of us who open ourselves to new ideas and experiences and

who are willing to occasionally place ourselves in situations that are a bit

overwhelming are more likely to achieve this type of peak experience and are,

therefore, more likely to shift and evolve. On the other hand, people who resist

the flux of new energy, stimuli, ideas, and matter into their brains (via their bodies)

rarely, if ever, have peak experiences and evolve very slowly, if at all.

 The dissipative process of structures  evolving (in order to handle increased

energy flow) into more complex states possibly explains several of the observed

reactions of members within my BGI practice. As members receive care, they

may find that people and events to which they once reacted with stress and

discomfort have less capacity to 'create' the level of distress, as they did n the

past. It appears that they are able to 'flow' more easily with the events of their

lives.

 So much of what we do in our office goes far deeper

than treating an individual's symptoms or conditions.

Much of our inner healing is dramatically influenced by

pre-learned and pre-conditioned social norms --

behaviors created in our childhood by parents,

teachers, other family members, friends, and anyone else with whom we have

associated.  These behaviors frequently are learned as survival methods in

particular family situations; they typically fall into three categories:

those that attempt to reduce the amount of overwhelm by desperately trying

to  push or disperse entropy out of the system: by yelling,screaming,

crying, talking, running, compulsive behaviors, and physical ailments

those that seek to  block additional energy from entering the system:

depression, withdrawal, loss of appetite, sickness: this could include the use

of drugs, alcohol, food addiction, dissociation, excess television watching,

and excess reading.

those that seek to  distract one from feeling the increase of internalized

chaos as the system approaches its evolutionary "moment of truth"

(Research appears to indicate that this method of reducing internal stress

rarely succeeds and over time often results in the body attempting to

dissipate the entropy physically, often in the form of debilitating or life-

threatening diseases)

As the  upper limits (approaching our Peak Experience or Moment of Truth) of our

brains' tolerances to input are approached, where the system is either going to

collapse or evolve to a higher order, we often pull out all the stops in a final

desperate effort to  maintain the current system function. Desperate attempts to

save an overwhelmed system only inhibit the growth process and are based on a

self-created and propagated  illusion.  In a purest form, should not our goal be to

not block or submerge the extra energy, but rather, would it not be most healing to

"be with it" and experience this tension in such a way that the nervous system

and body can more

easily and naturally

reorganize

themselves at a more

evolved level?

Society, in general,

influences  and projects values and roles that everyone  accepts as being part of

the "herd". Values of one's culture (and more

closely from within one's family) dramatically

over-shadows the ideologies of health,

healing, and disease that each of us carries

with us throughout our lives. The doctor of

BioGeometric care, at the same time, probably

speaks in terms that may be foreign to the

general public.

What does all this mean to someone wishing to embark upon a journey of new

insights and strategies for one's personal growth and transformation?

  For more.
Actually,... our senses of most emotions are created by our own learned perceptions and not by the elements of our environment.
Living Dissipative Beings:  Able to reorganize to higher levels and discovering that fluctuations that once put stress on the system are now more easily processed and “handled”.
Important Notice:   We are not the  system, rather we are the evolutionary process itself. To evolve is to be consistently updating this process and our relationship to our environment, until our self concept includes all of the interrelationships that make up who we  really are - our interconnectedness with the Universe.  (note: the “system” is nothing other than our Ego, which is a conceptualization of ourself and our relationship to the world.)
“Accepting“ Societal Expectations and Roles:  Is this statement true, however?? Is each of us fully happy with all events and relationships within our life process? Do we at times not blindly accept factors in our daily journey, just so we don’t “rock the boat”?  
Illusion... That we are our Ego, that we are a concept of ourself, rather than the being itself. While the ego is a useful (although limited) “map of reality”, confusing the map for the actual “territory” is one of the most limiting behaviors that a human can do.  
For More… BioGeometric Integration's Tetrahedrons
An Introspection into One’s Self (Continued...)
                        Joseph B. Clifford, D.C.
Say "NO!" to the development and  production genetically modified foods!
Protect our Constitution!

Side notes:

The sensory processes may be something like this: 1.Things make sense, at conscious and/or subconscious levels 2..As more chaos is internalized, less and less sense is made from outside or inside processes 3.After reorganization, greater  clarity is perceived in a brand new way, as never before imagined, and  more efficient responsiveness is available.      As a BioGeometric Integration  chiropractor, I speak in terms of our adjustments or entrainments helping each nervous system to resolve 'tensions' of the spine and its cord, which may have been associated with neural engrams (Ie. nervous system memories or “snapshots”).    BioGeometric Integration  care provides a means by which the tissues of our  nervous system and body can release pent up energy, mental resistance, and physical tensions, created by old physical, emotional, and chemical overloads.     Note: In moving through a personal growth process, including our   BioGeometric Integration   chiropractic care, it is crucial that one begin to notice which  behaviors, in moments of temporary overwhelm, are attempts to block or deaden the incoming energy and which are attempts to frantically dissipate entropy back into the environment.   A challenge presents itself when a large segment of the society requires some form of 're- educational' process prior to initiating care.  Comfort zones are  "stretched", as new seekers of care are exposed to such concepts as Innate Intelligence, healing, and Life force. I do find, however, a thrill and honor in presenting a set of different values and prospective  goals to new entries and to those of the practice who have been with us as part of our BioGeometric Integration family.

Our Brain:

 Our brain is the ultimate

dissipative structure. It

constantly takes in energy, in the

forms of different stimuli (from

our senses that detect light,

sound, vibration, heat, pressure,

touch, etc.) and matter from the

environment. It must also

dissipate the entropy that is

created back into its

surroundings. In a healthy state,

we can handle amazing amounts

of flux, while encountering all

kinds of new ideas, stimuli, and

internal and external

environmental events. It can

handle these changes without

threat to the system. 

 If inputs of  stimuli (be they

mental/emotional/ physical, or

chemical) reach a certain critical

point (each of us has individual

differences), we begin to feel

overwhelmed, and we become

less and less capable of dealing

with continued environmental

stimulating inputs. Without some

relief, the  system (our mental

constructs of “What is”, is forced

either to break down or to

reorganize into a higher and

more organized level.

 This "moment of truth" will in all

likelihood be  experienced

(escaping into a higher order) by

people at individual rates, while

other individuals may very slowly

or never grow into a higher

order.  Abraham Maslow called

this event a "peak experience".

Those of us who open ourselves

to new ideas and experiences

and who are willing to

occasionally place ourselves in

situations that are a bit

overwhelming are more likely to

achieve this type of peak

experience and are, therefore,

more likely to shift and evolve.

On the other hand, people who

resist the flux of new energy,

stimuli, ideas, and matter into

their brains (via their bodies)

rarely, if ever, have peak

experiences and evolve very

slowly, if at all.

 The dissipative process of

structures  evolving (in order to

handle increased energy flow)

into more complex states

possibly explains several of the

observed reactions of members

within my BGI practice. As

members receive care, they may

find that people and events to

which they once reacted with

stress and discomfort have less

capacity to 'create' the level of

distress, as they did n the past. It

appears that they are able to

'flow' more easily with the events

of their lives.

 So much of what we do in our

office goes far deeper than

treating an individual's

symptoms or conditions. Much of

our inner healing is dramatically

influenced by

pre-learned and

pre-

conditioned

social norms --

behaviors

created in our childhood by

parents, teachers, other family

members, friends, and anyone

else with whom we have

associated.  These behaviors

frequently are learned as

survival methods in particular

family situations; they typically

fall into three categories:

those that attempt to

reduce the amount of

overwhelm by desperately

trying to  push or disperse 

entropy out of the system:

by yelling,screaming,

crying, talking, running,

compulsive behaviors, and

physical ailments

those that seek to  block

additional energy from

entering the system:

depression, withdrawal,

loss of appetite, sickness:

this could include the use

of drugs, alcohol, food

addiction, dissociation,

excess television watching,

and excess reading.

those that seek to  distract

one from feeling the

increase of internalized

chaos as the system

approaches its evolutionary

"moment of truth"

(Research appears to

indicate that this method of

reducing internal stress

rarely succeeds and over

time often results in the

body attempting to

dissipate the entropy

physically, often in the form

of debilitating or life-

threatening diseases)

As the  upper limits (approaching

our Peak Experience or Moment

of Truth) of our brains' tolerances

to input are approached, where

the system is either going to

collapse or evolve to a higher

order, we often pull out all the

stops in a final desperate effort

to  maintain the current system

function. Desperate attempts to

save an overwhelmed system

only inhibit the growth process

and are based on a self-created

and propagated  illusion.  In a

purest form, should not our goal

be to not block or submerge the

extra energy, but rather, would it

not be most healing to "be with

it" and experience this tension in

such a way that the nervous

system and body can more

easily and naturally reorganize

themselves at a more evolved

level?

Society, in general, influences 

and projects values and roles

that everyone  accepts as being

part of the "herd". Values of

one's culture (and more closely

from within one's family)

dramatically over-shadows the

ideologies of health, healing, and

disease that each of us carries

with us throughout our lives. The

doctor of BioGeometric care, at

the same time, probably speaks

in terms that may be foreign to

the general public.

What does all this mean to

someone wishing to embark

upon a journey of new insights

and strategies for one's personal

growth and transformation?

  For more.
Actually,... our senses of most emotions are created by our own learned perceptions and not by the elements of our environment.
Living Dissipative Beings:  Able to reorganize to higher levels and discovering that fluctuations that once put stress on the system are now more easily processed and “handled”.
“Accepting“ Societal Expectations and Roles:  Is this statement true, however?? Is each of us fully happy with all events and relationships within our life process? Do we at times not blindly accept factors in our daily journey, just so we don’t “rock the boat”?  
For More…
Illusion... That we are our Ego, that we are a concept of ourself, rather than the being itself. While the ego is a useful (although limited) “map of reality”, confusing the map for the actual “territory” is one of the most limiting behaviors that a human can do.  
Important Notice:   We are not the  system, rather we are the evolutionary process itself. To evolve is to be consistently updating this process and our relationship to our environment, until our self concept includes all of the interrelationships that make up who we  really are - our interconnectedness with the Universe.  (note: the “system” is nothing other than our Ego, which is a conceptualization of ourself and our relationship to the world.)